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Equality: how can I be a good citizen of the world?

Planet Earth has tremendous resources and potential, but they are not shared equally. Human history, culture and luck have created an extremely uneven playing field and an unsustainable situation.

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About the talk

Climate impacts fall disproportionately on the poorest and are disproportionately caused by the richest. There isn't even equality in the fight to create a better world. As highlighted by Craig Bennett, former CEO of Friends of the Earth, western environmental movements can be seen as a "white middle-class ghetto", but there is a real need to ensure that more diverse groups recognise how environmental issues affect their lives. 

In this event, we tackle this topic head-on. Whose voices are not being heard, and why? Whose climate-related problems are not being heard, and why? How do we make sure that all communities have access to the new jobs associated with a green revolution? Who do we need to listen to and what do we need to do to make everybody equally welcome on the path to a more sustainable planet?

Speakers include:

  • Michaela Howell: With expertise in engaging stakeholders and communities, Michaela Howell joined Groundwork Greater Manchester in March 2019, having previously led a partnership to secure and deliver a £50m programme from The National Lottery Community Fund.
  • Zarina Ahmad: Climate Change Trainer at CEMVO (Council of Ethnic Minority Voluntary Sector Organisations) Scotland, and PhD at University of Manchester focused on sustainable behaviours in under-represented groups. 
  • Paul Dennett: Elected Mayor of Salford in 2016, Paul Dennett has a long history of campaigning on social issues and has recently overseen the Greater Manchester Housing Strategy. Paul is currently leading on the Infrastructure Strategy and Plan for Homes, Jobs and the Environment for the city-region.
  • Sarah Lindley: Professor of Geography at University of Manchester.

This is the second part of our series of talks curated by Physicist Helen Czerski, looking at equality, food and transport in the context of climate change.